Mid distance to close distance play

Table Tennis Footwork

Last updated 6 years ago

Xariuz Cruz

Xariuz Cruz Asked 8 years ago

Hi Pingskills! I found that I start to play mid-far distance more than close distance play, this will add more laziness to me and how can I start to play close distance? I use XIOM Vega Elite + Yinhe Moon on a Yinhe MC2 blade


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario Answered 8 years ago

Hi Xariuz,

You could put a marker on the floor and in training check that you are not moving behind the marker.  This will focus attention on your position.


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Thoughts on this question

mat huang

mat huang Posted 8 years ago

i dont think it is a bad idea to play mid distance

1) YOu wont get lazier- it is harder as it requires more power and more footowrk

2) Most of the top players/intermediate generally do a lot of counterlooping]

If you like playing close distance it is also good


Xariuz Cruz

Xariuz Cruz Posted 8 years ago

Yeah, mid distance is good, but I cant learn some more close distance play if like this!


mat huang

mat huang Posted 8 years ago

you're right. always good to learn a variety of skill


Ilia Minkin

Ilia Minkin Posted 7 years ago

Hi Alois,

I have a question. I see that people often say something like "X is a close to the table looper" or "Y is a mid-distance looper". What is the difference? I don't understand it, since for me there is my perfect hitting zone for each ball. If the ball is shallow, I'm a "close to the table looper", if the ball is deep, I'm a "mid-distance looper" and my distance is dictated by the ball, not my intentions.


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 7 years ago

Hi Ilia,

I guess some players if given the choice like to be a little further away from the table and take the ball later in its trajectory while others take it closer to the bounce.


Ilia Minkin

Ilia Minkin Posted 7 years ago

So I wonder how are called the players mostly taking the ball at the top off the bounce :)


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 7 years ago

Close to table attacking players.  However the name is not that important.


Ilia Minkin

Ilia Minkin Posted 7 years ago

Alois, thank you for the clarification. Yes, the name is not that important, but at least I know do other people mean. 


Ilia Minkin

Ilia Minkin Posted 6 years ago

Hi Alois,

I recently saw this amazing footage of the match between Oshima and Ovtcharov. I actually like this angle very much. Partially, because it exposes their in and out footwork. So, looking at those two players, would you agree that Oshima is a close to the table player, while Ovtcharov plays from mid-distance? And is it generally better for a tall and bulky player (6'3'' and 200 lbs) to drift more to mid-distance?


D K

D K Posted 6 years ago

This does not affect the game too much.

No matter how fat or tall the player is,he can always overcome this if he has strong legs.

And additionally,tall player has usually longer arms,thus it is really better for him to play mid-range,as his swing needs more time and also can be more powerful due to increased lever effect.
Also,he can generate more spin,because he can have longer stroke.Thirdly,he has longer range from one place.

As far as for examples,typical short-range attackers are usually shortpips hitters,such as He Zhi Wen or Liu Guoliang.

Typical mid-range looper is fr example Xu Xin.

Between Ovtcharov and Oshima there is much less difference.

 


Ilia Minkin

Ilia Minkin Posted 6 years ago

Well, my observation is that Ovtcharov takes a big step back after each serve, while Oshima sticks closer to the table. 

Regarding bulky players (I am one of them), I feel that playing further away gives more time to engage trunk and legs into a power shot, which utilizes the advantage of being a big guy. I just don't know whether it is a good idea in the long run, maybe after some more practice I will be able to exploit my power while still being closer to the table.



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