Why is it called a Let

Table Tennis Discussion

Last updated 9 years ago

Jayce Soberano

Jayce Soberano Asked 9 years ago

Why is it called "let" and not "Net" when you hit the net with a serve.

When i watch matches on youtube i always thought i heard wrong when they say "let".


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario Answered 9 years ago

Hi Jayce,

It is officially called a 'Let' but I am not sure why.

Good question, let's see what information we can come up with from our readers.


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Thoughts on this question

Frendy Halim

Frendy Halim Posted 9 years ago

i know it's let but in my country i never heard let but what the umpire said is net
maybe the let mean he let you do to the serve again... maybe ?


Ji-Soo Woo

Ji-Soo Woo Posted 9 years ago

 

this answer applies to tennis but I assume same origin

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070816223510AASLxze


Sihmanuth Prak

Sihmanuth Prak Posted 9 years ago

Please answer my question faster please because I all most have ping pong torment 


Frendy Halim

Frendy Halim Posted 9 years ago

be patient please... pingskills is not 24 hours online
they need to rest too ! they're not robots :D


Phillip Simmons

Phillip Simmons Posted 9 years ago

I can answer the question.  It is based on tennis.  When the served ball first hits the net it is a "net", meaning the receiver does not have to attempt to hit the ball.  If the ball lands on the table, it is a "net" and the serve is played over.  If the ball doesn't hit the table, it is a "fault" and the server loses the point.  So the call should be net when it hits the net and "let" if it lands on the table, or a "fault" if it does not.  In tennis there are usually two distinct calls, a "net" when the ball hits the net, then a" let" or a" fault" based on where the ball lands.

Of course in table tennis by the time a serve is called it may have already done both.

I hope this helps.

Phil


Ji-Soo Woo

Ji-Soo Woo Posted 9 years ago

'Let' originates from the French word for net which is 'filet'.


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 9 years ago

Ji-Soo, I knew we could count on you!


Ji-Soo Woo

Ji-Soo Woo Posted 9 years ago

Apparently there is another possibility...

"According to the American Heritage Dictionary, the word "let", defined as "hindrance", is derived from the Middle English verb "letten" to hinder, the noun form being "lette". This, in turn, is derived from the Old English word "lettan", to hinder. Ultimately, the root word is "loet", to slow. Nothing to do with the French language!”

 

I guess these things are usually not very clear cut!


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 9 years ago

Come on Ji-Soo, just when I thought you had given us something definitive...


Ji-Soo Woo

Ji-Soo Woo Posted 9 years ago

Sorry Coach, just trying to convey all the facts!  ;)

If it's worth anything, I lean towards the first explanation given that we already know "love" is from the french "l'oeuf" (the egg) so obviously the game of tennis was heavily influenced by french terminology.


Jayce Soberano

Jayce Soberano Posted 9 years ago

Thnx for the answers. Though it doesnt make sense to use let instead of net in serving...



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