LP strategy

Table Tennis Match Strategy

Last updated 7 years ago

Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Asked 8 years ago

Hi, Pingskills

I have watched just now a video about how to dominate LP, in which you define basic strategy how to play against LP. Now, Alois, in your video you explain that LP converts spin, so, if you serve back spin, you will get a topspin. But, sometimes, when I push backspin ball, or try to curve it on the side, it goes to the net. Why so? I saw some Joo's returns, even if it is a short ball coming to him, he somehow does chopping-like movement, starting higher with his bat and curve more to the side and up. Of course, I know he is a super player, but, how does he do that? And one other thing: many players have basic strategy against LP, which is: one topspin, one push. So, try to imagine this: my opponent top spins the ball, I am away from the table, and I chop it. Then my opponent pushes with backspin. I am running to catch the ball. But, how should I play against that ball, without giving a possibility to my opponent to attack? Thank you


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario Answered 8 years ago

Hi Sasha,

When they play this short ball with backspin, try to get there in time to be balanced which is the hard part.  Then, play an attacking ball with the long pimples.  Or if you push the ball make sure it is deep and fast to their weaker corner, which is usually the backhand.

The sidespin push is tricky but if the ball is going into the net, lift the ball more upwards with your follow through.


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Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Posted 8 years ago

Great tip, I will try that


Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Posted 8 years ago

Hi, Alois. Can you tell me, when playing long pips, does the sponge have any effect on playing. What is the exact difference between OX and rubber with sponge? And, if so, can you tell me what is the minimum thickness to play chops away from the table? For example, is 1,1 mm sponge OK to play that way, or should you use a thicker sponge. Thank you


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 8 years ago

Hi Sasha,

YOu can use any long pimple to chop with .  The OX makes it easier to revers the spin.  It is harder to control the ball without sponge however.  So the thicker the sponge the better control.  The thinner the sponge the better the effect.


Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Posted 8 years ago

So, you are saying that I could chop from distance as easily with, for example, Feint Long II with 0,5 mm sponge, as with my current rubber Destroyer 1,5 mm, if I am correct. The thing is, other players have tried my rubber, and they say that it's not too deceptive. For instance, I still struggle with backspin, because my opponents keep sending me backspin, and I cannot attack it, the ball sometimes goes over the net, often in the net. I know you suggested me flat pushes, but, I can't set my blade vertical on short backspin. Can you tell me where can I find a player who plays that way? And what is the way to make good deception, is thinner sponge better for deception?


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 8 years ago

Hi Sasha,

Some pimples may be easier than others but you can chop with any long pimples.

Others may have suggestions for players to watch out for.

Thinner sponge will give you more effect with the long pimples.


Ji-Soo Woo

Ji-Soo Woo Posted 8 years ago

As Alois says, there are differences between LPs, but one can make some rule-of-thumb generalisations (keeping in mind that they ARE generalisations).

OX is generally used more for close-to-table player, LP with sponge more for away-from-table chopping.

You can however chop with OX too.  Apparently (can't confirm this but read it somewhere) Sun Jian Fei is the highest rated OX chopper in the world.  However, the top world class choppers predominantly use sponge.  I heard Joo uses 1.5mm, Chen Weixing uses 1mm, and the recent winner of the 2013 Japan Open and 2013 Czech Open, Shiono, uses 0.5mm.

As a general rule, as Alois said, OX LP = more spin reversal.  More spin reversal is good and bad.  It's good against weaker players and players who are not familiar with playing against LP because it is MOST different from the way inverted rubbers behave.  It can be a liability against strong players and players who know how to play against LPs because it is quite passive.  More spin reversal means your spin depends on whatever spin the opponent gives you, and so good players know exactly what they are getting back and can set you up.

The benefits of LP with sponge are that, when you get further from the table, it is easier to land the chops on the table because the sponge gives more oomph off your bat.  With OX, you have to put a lot more effort just to get the ball back on the table.  Also, less spin reversal means you can manipulate spin more yourself...i.e. you can vary the spin on your chops more which makes it harder for the attacker.

I've never tried the Stiga Destroyer but it is a highly regarded LP rubber.  If you are not having much success with it (with all due respect) I suspect it is more a problem of technique than the rubber itself.  Also, if you are fairly new to LP chopping, 1.5mm sounds rather thick.  With that thickness the LP may be too fast which inhibits development of proper chopping technique.  I would go with 1mm or even 0.5mm.  I think the success of Shiono demonstrates 0.5mm is a perfectly viable sponge thickness which allows for chopping but also gives good control.  I myself use TSP Curl P1r in 0.5mm and find it very effective.


Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Posted 8 years ago

Hi, Ji-Soo Woo

You are absolutely right. I am new at chopping. But, my problem is not so much chopping away from the table, as serve returns and playing against backspin are. You see, it seems like there is not too much deception on it. My pushes, especially when I push with my blade horizontally, are flat, and easy to attack. When I am away from the table, I am good, but, my opponents keep me close, and I can't play my game. What are your experiences on that, how do you perform? How to vary those spins with chops? And many thanks for this exquisite explanation.


Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Posted 8 years ago

And, Alois, I have a question for you. I will try to play with a sponge, but, if I decide do play OX, here are my doubts: will my chops have enough power to get to my opponent's side of the table ( I am standing far from the table, of course ), even if I am using defensive blade Matsushita Pro? And, is it possible, if I try to play OX, just to remove, or better say, separate the tops heet from sponge and just glue the top sheet? If possible, is there any special procedure, or I could just as do it as I glue normal rubber with sponge. Thanks


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 8 years ago

Hi Sasha,

You will have enough power with the OX.

You are better off to get a rubber that is prepared already.  It is messy trying to separate or stick down the sponge and the rubber.


Ji-Soo Woo

Ji-Soo Woo Posted 8 years ago

If you are looking to win with "deception", I suspect you might do well with an OX LP with maximum spin reversal.  I've been told Tibhar Grass Dtecs OX has one of the heaviest spin reversals around (I've used this rubber before - but only in 1.2mm).  In terms of what to do in the case where someone heavy loops, you chop, and they then do a gentle push to bring you in to the table, my main objective is not so much to trick them with deception but to stop them from being able to do a strong follow up attack with me close to the table to win the point.  One option that some players use is to twiddle and to push with the inverted side...which allows you to return the ball with heavy backspin.  If you twiddle some times and not twiddle other times, this can also be a good tool for deception - especially if you push below the table and they can't see which rubber you used.  If you push with the LP, there won't be much backspin on the ball and they could easily hit their attacking shot long.  If you push with inverted, there will be heavy backspin and they can dump their next shot into the net.  If pushing with LP, key thing is to keep the ball low.  A low, dead ball can be really hard for even good players to attack strongly.  You should also develop a fast push to the corners because if you force them to move AND attack, it makes it less likely they can attack strongly.

Generally if someone is just pushing to you, LP players generally do well in that exchange because when they push to your LP and you push back, the ball comes back dead or with light topspin even and their next push often pops up.


Sasha Savic

Sasha Savic Posted 8 years ago

Thank you, Alois and Ji-Soo Woo. But, tell me, Ji-Soo, what kind of a push you think is good: should I go under the ball, like you do with inverted rubber, or flat, with blade horizontal or vertical. And, since I had a sponge, I couldn't make too much deception, but, is there a way to deceive my opponents with LP, how can I vary the spin?


D K

D K Posted 7 years ago

Hi Sasha
under ball or flat stroke...you can do both,it is just about the angle of the bat



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